phosphate
426 Views

GC: n

CT: Inorganic compounds containing phosphorous. Used in fertilizers (as plant nutrient) and in detergents (as ‘builders’ or water softeners), phosphates are a major source of water pollution. There presence in lakes and ponds encourages explosive algae growth which depletes water-dissolved oxygen, resulting in elimination of other forms of aquatic life.

S: BD – https://goo.gl/U6y7zx (last access: 9 December 2016)

N: 1. A salt of phosphoric acid, 1795, from French phosphate (1787), from phosphore (see phosphorus) + -ate (3).
Frequent use in plural.
2. There are a few characteristics that define phosphate properties, mainly molecular structure and pH (generally in a 1% solution). These determine the functionality of phosphates, which in turn determine how phosphates are used. They can contribute buffering strength, sequestering (or chelating) power, dispersion and absorptive capabilities, and solubility. Phosphates are usually used as compounds of phosphate ions in combination with one or more common elements, such as sodium, calcium, potassium, and aluminum.
3. Phosphates are usually used as compounds of phosphate ions in combination with one or more common elements, such as sodium, calcium, potassium, and aluminum.
4. Phosphates are classified into several primary groups based on the number of phosphorus (P) molecules. Each of these groups have functional properties ideal for many applications.

  • Orthophosphates bluearrow Buffering – detergents
  • Pyrophosphates bluearrow Sequestering – water treatment, metal cleaning
  • Tripolyphosphates bluearrow Dispersant – meat processing, dish detergent
  • Polyphosphates bluearrow Dispersant – kaolin production.

S: 1. OED – https://goo.gl/KRm4eF (last access: 9 December 2016). 2 to 4. phosphatesfacts – https://goo.gl/W1izo2 (last access: 9 December 2016).

SYN:
S:

CR: carbon , hydrocarbon, hydrogen.